2016 Bible Reading for March and April

Be true to yourself, help others, make each day your masterpiece, make friendship a fine art, drink deeply from good books — especially the Bible, build a shelter against a rainy day, give thanks for your blessings and pray for guidance every day.   John Wooden: an American basketball player and coach. He won ten NCAA national championships in a 12-year period — an unprecedented seven in a row.

IMG_20160223_144931It has been two months since the 2016 Bible Reading Challenge began. This week I have March and April for you. Easter comes early this year (March 27). A great way to prepare for Easter is to read what God has to say to us. If you have not joined us yet, it is never too late. You can begin reading Scripture wherever you would like or pick up on March 1 reading at Liviticus 25 (Old Testament) or Luke 22 (New Testament). Then keep reading everyday.

I have to admit it is difficult starting a new habit. Reading Scripture everyday is a new habit for most of us, and sometimes we fall short of developing that new skill/habit. So don’t give up! Begin reading today.

March 2016

March 1      Leviticus 25  ∼∼  Psalm 54  ∼∼  Proverbs 1  ∼∼  Luke 22

March 2      Leviticus 26  ∼∼ Psalm 55  ∼∼  Proverbs 2  ∼∼  Luke 23

March 3      Leviticus 27  ∼∼  Psalm 56  ∼∼  Proverbs 3  ∼∼  Luke 24

March 4      Numbers 1 & 2  ∼∼  Psalm 57  ∼∼  Proverbs 4  ∼∼  John 1

March 5      Numbers 3  ∼∼  Psalm 58  ∼∼  Proverbs 5  ∼∼  John 2

March 6      Numbers 4  ∼∼  Psalm 59  ∼∼  Proverbs 6  ∼∼  John 3

March 7      Numbers 5 & 6  ∼∼  Psalm 60  ∼∼  Proverbs 7  ∼∼  John 4

March 8      Numbers 7  ∼∼  Psalm 61  ∼∼  Proverbs 8  ∼∼  John 5 

March 9      Numbers 8 & 9  ∼∼  Psalm 62  ∼∼  Proverbs 9  ∼∼  John 6

March 10    Numbers 10 & 11  ∼∼  Psalm 63  ∼∼  Proverbs 10  ∼∼  John 7

March 11    Numbers 12 & 13  ∼∼  Psalm 64  ∼∼  Proverbs 11  ∼∼  John 8  

March 12    Numbers 14  ∼∼  Psalm 65  ∼∼  Proverbs 12  ∼∼  John 9

March 13    Numbers 15 & 16  ∼∼  Psalm 66  ∼∼  Proverbs 13  ∼∼  John 10

March 14    Numbers 17 & 18  ∼∼  Psalm 67  ∼∼  Proverbs 14  ∼∼  John 11

March 15    Numbers 19 & 20  ∼∼  Psalm 68  ∼∼  Proverbs 15  ∼∼  John 12

March 16    Numbers 21 & 22  ∼∼  Psalm 68: 19-35  ∼∼  Proverbs 16  ∼∼  John 13

March 17    Numbers 23 & 24  ∼∼  Psalm 69: 1-15  ∼∼  Proverbs 17  ∼∼  John 14 & 15

March 18    Numbers 25 & 26 ∼∼ Psalm 69: 16 & 36 ∼∼ Proverbs 18 ∼∼ John 16 & 17

March 19    Numbers 27 & 28  ∼∼  Psalm 70  ∼∼  Proverbs 19  ∼∼  John 18

March 20    Numbers 29 & 30  ∼∼  Psalm 71: 1-16  ∼∼ Proverbs 20  ∼∼  John 19  

March21    Numbers 31 & 32  ∼∼  Psalm 71: 17-24  ∼∼  Proverbs 21  ∼∼  John 20 & 21

March 22   Numbers 33 & 34  ∼∼  Psalm 72  ∼∼  Proverbs 22  ∼∼  Acts 1

March 23   Number 35 & 36  ∼∼  Psalm 73: 1-14  ∼∼  Proverbs 23  ∼∼  Acts 2

March 24   Deuteronomy 1  ∼∼  Psalm 73: 15-28  ∼∼  Proverbs 24  ∼∼  Acts 3

March 25   Deuteronomy 2 & 3  ∼∼  Psalm 74: 1-11  ∼∼  Proverbs 25  ∼∼  Acts 4

March 26   Deuteronomy 4  ∼∼  Psalm 74: 12-23  ∼∼  Proverbs 26  ∼∼  Acts 5

March 27   Deuteronomy 5 & 6  ∼∼  Psalm 75  ∼∼  Proverbs 27  ∼∼  Acts 6

March 28   Deuteronomy 7 & 8  ∼∼  Psalm 76  ∼∼  Proverbs 28  ∼∼  Acts 7

March 29   Deuteronomy 9 & 10  ∼∼  Psalm 77  ∼∼  Proverbs 29  ∼∼  Acts 8

March 30   Deuteronomy 11 & 12  ∼∼  Psalm 78: 1-20 ∼∼  Proverbs 30  ∼∼  Acts 9

March 31   Deuteronomy 13 & 14 ∼∼ Psalm 78: 21-33 ∼∼ Proverbs 31 ∼∼ Acts 10

April 2016

April 1    Deuteronomy 15 & 16 ∼∼ Psalm 78: 34-55 ∼∼ Proverbs 1 ∼∼ Acts 11 & 12

April 2    Deuteronomy 17-19  ∼∼  Psalm 78: 56-72  ∼∼ Proverbs 2  ∼∼  Acts 13

April 3    Deuteronomy 20 & 21  ∼∼  Psalm 79  ∼∼  Proverbs 3  ∼∼  Acts 14

April 4    Deuteronomy 22 & 23  ∼∼  Psalm 80  ∼∼  Proverbs 4  ∼∼  James 1 & 2

April 5    Deuteronomy 24 & 25  ∼∼  Psalm 81  ∼∼  Proverbs 5  ∼∼  James 3-5

April 6    Deuteronomy 26 & 27 ∼∼  Psalm 82  ∼∼  Proverbs 6  ∼∼  Acts 15

April 7    Deuteronomy 28  ∼∼  Psalm 83  ∼∼  Proverbs 7  ∼∼  Galatians 1 & 2

April 8    Deuteronomy 29 & 30 ∼∼ Psalm 84 ∼∼ Proverbs 8 ∼∼ Galatians 3 & 4

April 9    Deuteronomy 31 & 32 ∼∼ Psalm 85 ∼∼ Proverbs 9 ∼∼ Galatians 5 & 6  

April 10  Deuteronomy 33 & 34 ∼∼ Psalm 86 ∼∼ Proverbs 10 ∼∼ Acts 16

April 11  Joshua 1-3  ∼∼  Psalm 87  ∼∼  Proverbs 11  ∼∼  Philippians 1 & 2

April 12  Joshua 4 & 5  ∼∼  Psalm 88  ∼∼  Proverbs 12  ∼∼  Philippians 3 & 4

April 13  Joshua 6 & 7  ∼∼  Psalm 89: 1-18  ∼∼  Proverbs 13  ∼∼  Acts 17

April 14  Joshua 8 & 9 ∼∼ Psalm 89: 19-37 ∼∼ Proverbs 14 ∼∼ 1 Thessalonians 1-3

April 15  Joshua 10 & 11 ∼ Psalm 89: 38-52 ∼ Proverbs 15 ∼ 1 Thessalonians 4 & 5

April 16  Joshua 12-14  ∼∼  Psalm 90  ∼∼  Proverbs 16  ∼∼  2 Thessalonians 1-3

April 17  Joshua 15 & 16  ∼∼  Psalm 91  ∼∼  Proverbs 17  ∼∼  Acts 18

April 18  Joshua 17 & 18 ∼∼ Psalm 92  ∼∼  Proverbs 18  ∼∼  1 Corinthians 1 & 2

April 19  Joshua 19 & 20 ∼∼ Psalm 93  ∼∼  Proverbs 19  ∼∼  1 Corinthians 3 & 4

April 20  Joshua 21 & 22 ∼ Psalm 94: 1-11 ∼ Proverbs 20 ∼ 1 Corinthians 5 & 6

April 21  Joshua 23 & 24 ∼ Psalm 94: 12-23 ∼ Proverbs 21 ∼ 1 Corinthians 7 & 8

April 22  Judges 1 & 2  ∼∼  Psalm 95  ∼∼  Proverbs 22  ∼∼  1 Corinthians 9 & 10

April 23  Judges 3 & 4  ∼∼  Psalm 96  ∼∼  Proverbs 23  ∼∼  1 Corinthians 11 & 12

April 24  Judges 5 & 6  ∼∼  Psalm 97 ∼∼  Proverbs 24  ∼∼  1 Corinthians 13 & 14

April 25  Judges 7 & 8  ∼∼  Psalm 98  ∼∼  Proverbs 25  ∼∼  1 Corinthians 15

April 26  Judges 9  ∼∼  Psalm 99  ∼∼  Proverbs 26  ∼∼  1 Corinthians 16

April 27  Judges 10 & 11  ∼∼  Psalm 100  ∼∼  Proverbs 27  ∼∼  2 Corinthians 1 & 2

April 28  Judges 12-14  ∼∼  Psalm 101  ∼∼  Proverbs 28  ∼∼  2 Corinthians 3-5

April 29  Judges 15 & 16 ∼ Psalm 102: 1-17 ∼ Proverbs 29 ∼ 2 Corinthians 6 & 7

April 30  Judges 17 ∼ Psalm 102: 18-28 ∼ Proverbs 30 & 31 ∼ 2 Corinthians 8 & 9

Today do something that challenges you!

 

 

 

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What Recipes Did A “Modern” 1924 Cookbook Offer?

    Modern Priscilla Cook Book (Special Subscription Edition) IMG_20160211_141755                                              Advantages of Accuracy            Money Saving. — “Bad Luck” caused more waste in the old-fashioned kitchen than any other one cause. Certainty in place of guessing eliminates failures.  Time Saving. — If we know just how long a dish should be cooked, and at just what temperature the oven should be held, the time we used to spend hovering near the stove to “see how it is coming along” is saved for something more profitable.  Mental Relief. — A feeling of confidence takes considerable strain from a busy woman’s mind  (page 3).

My  2016 Reading Challenge has a new category “Read a Cookbook.” I love reading cookbooks. It’s fun to see what recipes have lasted over the years – how they may change or stay the same. We all get in a rut cooking the same things over and over. By reading a good cookbook you can view something new and different. The Modern Priscilla Cook Book (1924) was my great-grandmother’s. My mother gave me this cookbook for Christmas 2015. She wrote on the inside cover: 

Linda, I thought you would like to have this. It was my grandmother’s and your great-grandmother’s. She gave it to me when I was married in 1948.

This is a treasured gift. I have enjoyed reading it, laughing at some of the crazy mixtures, and wondered about the hours women spent in the kitchen preparing meals for their families. It is amazing what past generations had to do just to provide for family. 

So, let’s get cooking: We will begin with breakfast.

Corn Meal Mush
1 cup corn meal            1 cup cold water
1 teaspoon salt             3 cups boiling water
Mix together corn meal, salt, and cold water, add boiling water and stir until smooth and boiling. Cook in a double boiler three hours or more. Serve with whole milk, or butter and syrup, for breakfast, luncheon or supper.   Servings 6   (page 100).

Next in line is lunch:

Cream of Lettuce Soup
1 quart chopped lettuce      2 tablespoons flour
2 1/2 cups stock (or water)    2 1/2 cups hot milk
2 tablespoons onion             1 3/4 teaspoons salt
2 tablespoons fat                   1/8 teaspoon pepper
Use the coarse outside leaves of a head of lettuce for soup, reserved the heart leaves for salads. A few left-over leaves of cress, endive or other leaves may be utilized. Chop very fine. Add stock (or water) and minced onion, and cook twenty minutes. Cream together butter, or other fat, and flour. Stir into hot milk and cook thirty minutes in double boiler. Add lettuce mixture and seasonings, bring to boil and serve at once.    Servings 6  
 (page 314).

Raisin Potato Bread
1 yeast cake
1 tablespoon shortening                                         IMG_20160216_105551
1/2 cup milk
1 1/2 cups mashed potato (sweet)
1/2 cup warm water
1 cup graham flour
1 teaspoon salt
2 cups scalded milk, cooled
Flour
1 1/2 cups raisins
Dissolve yeast in milk and water. Add salt and flour to make a stiff batter. Let rise overnight. In the morning add shortening, potato, graham flour, milk, and flour to make a stiff dough. Let rise until light, add raisins and knead. Then let rise again. Make into loaves and let rise until double in bulk before baking. Time in oven, 1 hour. Temperature 350º   (page 29).

Now for the last meal of the day: Dinner                                      

Pigeon Pie
6 pigeons                           8 slices carrots
Drippings                           2 sprigs parsley
Boiling water                    2 stalks celery
4 tablespoons butter      1 1/2 teaspoon peppercorns
1 onion                                3 tablespoons flour
8 cloves
Dress, clean, and truss (to tie or bundle together) pigeons and saute in drippings until entire surface is seared, turning frequently. Put in a kettle, nearly cover with boiling water, and add peppercorns, onion struck with cloves, carrot, parsley, and celery, and let simmer five hours, or cook in a fireless cooker until tender. Remove pigeons, strain liquor (the recipe says “liquor” not “liquid”), and thicken with butter melted and blended with flour. Reheat pigeons in sauce. Line a baking dish with pastry, arrange reheated pigeons in dish and cover with pastry. (Did anyone catch pulling off the meat from the bones before covering with pastry? Neither did I.) Bake in a hot oven. Time in oven, 30 minutes. Temperature 400°.   Servings 6   (page 272).

Serve with Mashed Potatoes  and:

String Beans, Lyonnaise
3 slices bacon
1/2 cup onion, sliced
3 cups canned string beans
Salt and Pepper
Cut bacon in small pieces, cook until crisp, and remove from the fat. Cook onion in the fat until slightly browned. Add beans, heat, and season to taste with salt and pepper. Turn into a hot vegetable dish and garnish with bacon.  Serving 6   (page 328).

Dessert: Fruit

When I added the Pigeon Pie, I was being funny. Who would eat Pigeon Pie? However, if someone makes some Pigeon Pie for me, I would eat it. I wonder if I could use this recipe and substutite chicken? 

Have a great rest of the week, and don’t forget “Today Do Something That Will Challenge You!”

 

Ted Conover’s “Coyotes: A Journey Across Borders …”

Hello my friends!! I have another great book for you, but I will get to it in a minute. 

I want to thank Melanie for her question about the 2016 Book Challenge. I have not only challenged everyone to reading 24 books in 2016, but I am also challenging everyone to make it a NO BUYING BOOK YEAR. Melanie says, ” … BUT … NO BUYING BOOK YEAR … does this include the “free” Kindle books … YIKES! … you got me in a sweat just thinking about this one!!”

Here’s my answer: NO this challenge does not include “free” Kindle books (www.kindlefreebooks.co.uk) or “free” Book Buds (www.bookbub.com). These books are offered for “free,” so you are not spending money on them. However, with “free” books you are not likely to get the most current publications. Most of the books I have downloaded are classics. On the other hand, this year may be a good time to catch-up on some classics. NO BUYING BOOK YEAR is just that: No buying! And “Yes” I am all ready being challenged. Also this challenge does not include professional books for your job, etc. 

Thanks for the question Melanie. If anyone else has a question or suggestion, please click on comment and let me know what you are thinking … now, onto this week’s book. 

Coyotes: A Journey Across Borders with America’s Illegal Migrants
by Ted Conover

(Published 1987 by Vintage Books, updated in 2006; 264 pages; nonfiction)

Sun slipped through the cracks left by poor workmanship, providing the shack’s only light. A space around the plywood slapped across the window, a slit between the corroding sheet-metal door and its jam, tiny arcs between crumbling cinder blocks and the corrugated tin roof: if you stood in the right places the rays hit your shoes, surrounded by cigarette butts, everything dusty on the dry dirt floor.
     Alonso, squatting down to give his legs a rest, surveyed the scores of butts. “Lots of wetbacks waited here, eh?” I thought of the minutes of worried waiting represented by each butt, the cumulative anxiety of them all. Already, since the coyotes had left us here, we had waited two hours; my cigarettes, now, were gone. No one but the coyotes — the smugglers — knew exactly where we were. If things were going according to plan, we were somewhere near the Rio Grande, and would soon be ferried across to the United States. But, if they disbelieved the story I had invented and still suspected I was an undercover cop, then … anything could happen (page 1).

This is how Ted Conover begins his journey in this true-life story of undocumented migrants crossing from Mexico into the United States. This is a new world for Conover, as it would be for any Americans who voluntarily put themselves in danger to learn how immigrants survive — or not survive — the grueling journey from the past into the future.

Conover does not want to “just” hear the stories; he wants to experience the uncertainty of the future, the fear of betrayal, the stress of being caught. Hundreds of people cross this border every day. Now it is his turn to sneak across the mighty river that serves as a natural border between Texas and Mexican states of Chihuahua, Coahuilo, Nuevo Le´on and Tamaulipas.

Some people cross the border by themselves or with others they know. But most put their lives into the hands of coyotes, smugglers who help people cross the US-Mexican border illegally. A coyote will charge people anywhere from $ 5,000 and up to help them get from one side of the river to the other. These fees are for the use of the route they are traveling — and to pay bribes or protection fees from Mexican law enforcement, gangs and drug cartels along the way.

However, having a coyote as a traveling companion is not always safe. Many coyotes take the money and then take the person or family hundreds of miles away from home, only to sell them to cartels or “forced recruitment.” Or the coyote abandons them in the desert to die. And yet, out of desperation, the number of people seeking this journey continues to grow.

Being aware of the dangers, immigrants still cross United States borders, looking for a place to survive, a place they can make a living to support their families, a place where they will feel safe from the violence that is so much a part of their lives. 

Ted Conover’s “Coyotes: A Journey Across Borders with American’s Illegal Migrants” takes us through the laughter, the sorrow, the hardships, the fear and anxiety of his journey. It is a testament to the fact that the human spirit is strong and willing to walk a dangerous path, if it means survival. 

This book could be used for #12 “Read a book that challenges and stretches your current opinions” in the 2016 Reading Challenge.

Today do somthing that will challenge you!